Author Topic: North Atlantic culinary issues  (Read 657 times)

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Offline Claus

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North Atlantic culinary issues
« on: 13:24 13-Nov-2012 »
No, no salo (pig-fat) there; but there is muktuk (seal-fat, also known as blubber), which is healthy and tastes in the direction of mature hazelnut. Beer, yes (Danish beer) but you have to keep in a thermos so it does not freeze into brownish ice.
And no, Greenland has not melted - yet. After all there is around 7 km's deep of 'eternal inland ice', and that does not melt away just because of a few decades of 'global heating'. Btw, that's why Greenland has its name - when the polar sun shines the reflections from the inland ice makes the sky glimmering green, which is the first you see of Greenland (in summer) when you approach by boat or plane...
In the winter, there is borealis - and socializing; with fjords and sea totally deep-frozen you (can) go and see your neighbours by dogsledge, and there is nothing else to do, anyhow...
Now, I do guess that we're deviating a lot here... Still, if anyone needs references to Ummanaq, Upernavik, Nuuk, Narsarsuaq, Illulissat, Sermermiut (these are towns/villages, not girls!), feel free to PM me!
« Last Edit: 13:46 13-Nov-2012 by Claus »

j'y suis, j'y reste!

Offline clanholmes

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Re: North Atlantic culinary issues
« Reply #1 on: 22:53 13-Nov-2012 »
No, no salo (pig-fat) there; but there is muktuk (seal-fat, also known as blubber), which is healthy and tastes in the direction of mature hazelnut. Beer, yes (Danish beer) but you have to keep in a thermos so it does not freeze into brownish ice.
And no, Greenland has not melted - yet. After all there is around 7 km's deep of 'eternal inland ice', and that does not melt away just because of a few decades of 'global heating'. Btw, that's why Greenland has its name - when the polar sun shines the reflections from the inland ice makes the sky glimmering green, which is the first you see of Greenland (in summer) when you approach by boat or plane...
In the winter, there is borealis - and socializing; with fjords and sea totally deep-frozen you (can) go and see your neighbours by dogsledge, and there is nothing else to do, anyhow...
Now, I do guess that we're deviating a lot here... Still, if anyone needs references to Ummanaq, Upernavik, Nuuk, Narsarsuaq, Illulissat, Sermermiut (these are towns/villages, not girls!), feel free to PM me!

Famous dish is rotten shark
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H%C3%A1karl

I am more of Iceland type. Great hikes and natural springs.
I know nothing except the fact of my ignorance.
Socrates

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Offline clanholmes

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Re: North Atlantic culinary issues
« Reply #2 on: 17:41 14-Nov-2012 »
"Hakarl is often referred to as an acquired taste and has a very particular ammonia-rich smell and fishy taste, similar to very strong cheese slathered in ammonia."

....er  ???  :o  I would even eat at McDonalds if I had the choice between the two and I would rather lick a hot dirty sidewalk in Times Square (pre hurricane) than touch McDonalds food ever again.

Wonder what was their secret sauce.


There are so many good quality ethnic fast food places that would do well in Ukraine.
I know nothing except the fact of my ignorance.
Socrates

Read, but not write