Author Topic: World War II Project: Political-Economic Variables  (Read 8692 times)

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Offline MWDabbs

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Re: World War II Project: Political-Economic Variables
« Reply #60 on: 10:59 17-Mar-2013 »
One more - a US infantry division - there were just about enough independent tank battalions to go 1 for 1 with the US Army Infantry Divisions.  Each had a different type of anti-tank battalion -- 57mm/6 pounders; wolverine M10's, M-18's and M-36's at the end; lots of artillery and lots of recon.  Not as well trained as most German divisions - but very well equipped once all of the attachments are considered. 

Leastwise, virtually every unit is different.  All are standardized with the same overall structure, but there are some little variations that "could make a difference". 

All units also have the capacity to increase their proficiency through combat -- or if decimated, could lose their proficiency and be subject to an "unknown" proficiency until they are tried in battle again.
« Last Edit: 11:11 17-Mar-2013 by MWDabbs »
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Offline MWDabbs

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Re: World War II Project: Political-Economic Variables
« Reply #61 on: 12:36 17-Mar-2013 »
Here's how the starting situation for the 1942-1945 project looks for a portion of the Southern Front/AGS.  That project spanned a full 2000 Allied Units and about 1350 Axis Units, for 156 turns.   Plenty of detail -- though some things had to be simplified as the game only allows 2000 units per side and only 1000 events... other limitations too - # of place names on the map, etc. 

On the current project -- The TO&E/OOB are essentially complete for almost all of the minor nations, France, the United States, Italy.  Germany's 1939 and Russia post May-1942.  England, Germany post-1939 and Russia 39 - 42 remain to be defined and organized -- still a LOT of work. 

From there, I'm still looking at having to complete about 65% of the map (Africa, Middle East and Far East) but this should go faster than my first efforts.  The potential for 10,000 events (if/then statements) is a major block of work, too. 

So... really a long ways from being complete, but the development is going pretty fast.  The events, I think, will be the most intricate component to get right.  A single broken event can break the game, so there's a lot of play testing to be done - but having done the 1942-1945 version, this too goes immensely faster.    Some "single events" can take up to 27 "if/then" statements to work properly -- and that's where I have the most difficulty.  The initial 1000 event limitation had a major impact though - I tried implementing more than there was space for, so some things ended up not working entirely as intended because of the simplification.

The overall idea though is to provide both players with "everything" that was historically available - and leave it to them how to apply it.  Sequence is an important factor and with hopefully 10k events - more depth can included.  Say an Allied invasion of Greece would fare better supply-wise if Crete was taken first.  Element of surprise is a factor though -- such that if Allies take Crete, Axis can probably guess that Greece or the Balkans are next; so a riskier invasion of the mainland would also serve to making Crete an easier proposition. 

So, these are all of the main parameters of TOAW and for this project.  Very complex, very detailed, very easy to play, very difficult to master.   While this project will allow for as much imaginative application as it can, provide for lots of options, there are pros and cons to each - and the dynamics of the game really apply best to the most realistic "combinations" of them. 

With early board games, units boiled down to having an attack factor of say 3, a defense of 3 and a movement of 3; or maybe 2/2/5, etc.  Therein a unit with a defense of 2 would basically perform the same whether it was being attacked by infantry, armor, airborne or air units.  Here though, all of what goes into defining the values of each unit extends from what is actually in the unit - which can change from turn to turn - whether it is sitting on open plains or in a town behind a super river... whether it has supporting air or artillery support.   
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Offline Claus

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Re: World War II Project: Political-Economic Variables
« Reply #62 on: 14:15 17-Mar-2013 »
Wow! I'm impressed  :)
And look forward to have the game functional.
j'y suis, j'y reste!

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Re: World War II Project: Political-Economic Variables
« Reply #63 on: 16:04 17-Mar-2013 »
Pre-war twat - Just to lend some credibility to the build-up.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=FO725Hbzfls

Offline MWDabbs

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Re: World War II Project: Political-Economic Variables
« Reply #64 on: 16:37 25-May-2013 »
Took a break from developing, but back at it - still testing the 1942 - 1945 scenario.  Thought it would be worthwhile to post some screen shots.  This comes from Turn 64 (July 23, 1943).

A quick recap -- the Afrika Korps was effectively forced out of Africa in 1942; leading to early Allied landings in Sicily ultimately prompting the Italians to capitulate.  The Allies haven't pressed against the first Axis line even though over half of it is comprised of Luftwaffe Field Divisions. 

The Allied commander decided to jump into the Balkans to support PLA partisan forces - with Axis responding with build-up in kind.  An Axis counteroffensive ran out of supply on the outskirts of Split.  Lines are stabilized and likely at a stalemate.

Finland (not shown) is in the process of being overwhelmed by the Russians.  The Russians were also able to link up to Leningrad very early on. 

The initial Axis offensive reached the outskirts of Stalingrad, but did not fight for the city as everything was thrown into the Caucasus - taking Maikop and Grozny easily.  A second force followed the coast along the Black Sea reaching Turkey, gradually pressed to Tblisi.  Rail engineers were brought in extending the rail line all the way up to 60 km west of Baku. 

A second Axis offensive eliminated the Soviet Bulge near Rhzev, shortening the line by several kilometers with a straight line toward Velikye Luki.  And that's where the Axis ran out of steam... or the Soviet's finally managed to achieve "concentration of force" just about everywhere. 

Subsequently, the Soviets launched an offensive against the Southern Volga near Astrakahn overwhelming the few Romanian and German divisions defending opposite the river.  Axis forces have only 50% of the units needed to establish a defensive line from Stalingrad to Grozny.  The third picture shows the situation at Grozny which has provided one supply boost and will provide another if it can be held for a year.  Supply, however, will need to be traced from the railhead at Tblisi, through the mountains.

The Axis effectively have no reserves.  Its replacement pool is severely lacking in early war tanks and artillery, but reinforcements are arriving fairly steadily.  The Allies hold at least a 3:2 advantage in the air, probably better than that.  Allied strategic bombing has taken out 5% of Axis rail transport, 3% of replacements and supply - but that's compensated by holding Grozny. 

This just shows some of the variables that can come into play with this "smaller and shorter" scenario - within the range of possibility, but with both sides subject to many of the same historical limitations and complications.  The big question is whether the Allies will have enough force to launch a "D-Day" type invasion of France given its commitment in the Balkans. 
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Offline clanholmes

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Re: World War II Project: Political-Economic Variables
« Reply #65 on: 04:10 27-May-2013 »
I can tell you were Avalon Game buff.

They hard a good tactical game called Third Reich

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Offline MWDabbs

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Re: World War II Project: Political-Economic Variables
« Reply #66 on: 14:34 30-May-2013 »
Yes, Avalon Hill had some really good games - Rise and Decline of the Third Reich, Squad Leader, Panzerblitz. 

It was always difficult finding other players back then, not to mention coming up with the space to play those games which could take weeks or even months.  When TOAW was fresh, we had ladders, tournaments, new player "courses", not uncommon for someone to have 4 - 6 games going at any given time. 
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Online Fraucha

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Re: World War II Project: Political-Economic Variables
« Reply #67 on: 16:26 30-May-2013 »
ASL for the win. I picked up an interesting book "The Last Battle" By Stephen Harding. Concerning several French VIP's held in a special castel prison defended by both Americans and Germans against the SS. Great read!
Peace is the failure of the military to convince the government that it can and should kick its enemies ass.