Author Topic: Visa & Registration Questions - Ask Now or Forever Hold Your Peace  (Read 28890 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Carlusha

  • Guest
Hi

I'm not sure what is meant by "epistle" - believe you mean "apostille".

We required -

In order to apply for permanent residence in Ukraine the following documents should be submitted:

    * written request (duly signed and dated) with formal declaration of intentions to apply for permanent
       residence in Ukraine (explaining reasons and indicating whether the applicant will be seeking financial
       assistance after being lawfully admitted for permanent residence);
    * completed application form in Ukrainian;
    * copy of the document confirming identity;
    * three recent passport sized photographs;
    * document confirming the place of residence;
    * information on family members, a copy of marriage certificate (if applicant is married);
    * police reply under the subject access provisions of the Data Protection Act 1998;
    * medical report certifying that applicant does not suffer from the infectious diseases, drug, toxic or
       alcohol addiction.

I believe, others will correct me if wrong, your marriage certificate should have a translation attached to it which requires to be "legalised" - that is, certified as being correct.

This is where the confusion arises. You should find similar information on the Ukrainian Embassy site in US where you're from.

Below is the current definition from my Ukrainian Embassy in UK.

LEGALISATION OF UK DOCUMENTS DESTINED FOR USE IN UKRAINE

On 22 December 2003 Ukraine acceded the Hague Conventionof 5 October 1961 Abolishing the Requirement of Legalization for Foreign Public Documents. The Convention provides for the simplified certification of public (including notarized) documents by means of an Apostille (certificate) to be used in countries that have joined the convention.

Ukraine's accession means that the "authentication chain" will no longer be required. Instead, UK documents destined for use in Ukraine (and Ukrainian documents to be used in the UK) should be certified by one of the officials in the jurisdiction in which the document has been executed.

Once a document has been notarised by a Notary public it needs to be apostilled. This means that the Notary's signature and seal are certified by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office will then attach an Apostille to the document.

The Legalisation Office
Norfolk House (West),
237 Silbury
Milton Keynes

 

With this certification by the Hague Convention Apostille, the document is entitled to recognition in Ukraine, and no legalization by the Consular/Visa Section of the Embassy of Ukraine is required (except the documents from Germany and Belgium).

Please note that all official documents, which were legalized through the regular Ukrainian or UK authentication chains before 22 December 2003 will remain valid and should be accepted by all Ukrainian and British agencies.


THE CONSULAR/VISA SECTION RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REQUEST ANY ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AS AND WHEN NECESSARY. ALL THE ABOVE MENTIONED CONDITIONS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT PRIOR NOTIFICATION.


I organised permanent residency from within Ukraine as well but I still had to return to UK to have our marriage certificate "legalised" and obtain the police checks.

Others may have similar or, because this is Ukraine, quite different experiences.

Offline tjtag

  • Subscriber
  • Expat Messenger
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 0
  • -Receive: 0
  • Posts: 11
  • Gender: Male
Carlushika,

Yes, I did mean apostille..

Thank you for your post and attempt to provide information, I have read the same legalization of documents requirements on the Ukrainian Embassy site located in the U.S.

It was not really planned at that time, so I was searching for another way to achieve the same end, in this day and age, it just seems so unlikely, that one would have to return to the U,S. to goto a Ukrainian Consulate, to legalize a document.

It may be the only way, I will have to do a little more research.

Once again, thank you for your reply



Carlusha

  • Guest
The way to start is your local OVIR (or whatever they are called these days).

As I said, in our case we did practically everything here in Ukraine. I was told by the then OVIR that I would have to present that document to the embassy in London.

Let's see how the others report their experiences.

I do hope everything sorts itself out for you both.

Offline Daniel

  • Subscriber
  • Expat VS
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 1
  • -Receive: 11
  • Posts: 51
Tjtag, I'll try to sort out within tomorrow whether there is any legal possibility to have the apostille not leaving Ukraine. At the same time, are you aware of the fact that, according to the law, you should be married with the Ukrainian citizen during 2 years prior you would be able to apply for the Ukrainian permanent residence (based on marriage)?

Offline P-N

  • Subscriber
  • I live here
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 634
  • -Receive: 2266
  • Posts: 8031
  • Gender: Male
  • Cogito Ergo Sum
    • Odessatalk
When I needed the UK apostile stamp (nothing to do with marriage on this occasion) I had to get the documents to London (I believe it has since move to Milton Keynes).  Rather than go, I sent it via DHL and paid an extra fee for the return to be signed for at my local Odessa Post Office.  (The UK will not return by currier).  It took a total of 2 weeks.  It also then, of course, had to be translated into Ukrainian and notarised.

I would also, having been through the process of getting PR status myself, advise you that it can also take some time (unless you grease the wheels) as it involves local (in your case USA........they said but I don't believe) and Interpol police checks as well as police checks in Ukraine.  The Interpol (and your national checks if true) are faxed there and faxed back (no other way apparantly) and therefore you can expect administrative delays whilst your Interpol and national checks sit in a tray gathering dust unless the wheels have been "greased" for a more timely administrative process.

The documentation required to get PR status though is minimal, as far as what you have to provide - (copies of your wife's and your own passports and marriage certificate and that is it - together with one passport style photo of yourself)........and as Daniel rightly states, you have to have a marriage of 2 years (to the day) or more. 

Just thought you should know  :D :D :D :D :D
« Last Edit: 20:56 21-Jan-2009 by P-N »
"When surrounded by the dark void of the willfully blind, it does not excuse those that are a spark of light their duty to shine" - Me

Offline tjtag

  • Subscriber
  • Expat Messenger
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 0
  • -Receive: 0
  • Posts: 11
  • Gender: Male
@Daniel

Yes, We have been married almost 5 years now, it's been great :) only the road is a little tough at times, the RED tape is what I'm speaking about. I would like to apply for the Permanent Resident Status based on the marriage, but I need to get the U.S. marriage certificate legalized first, that is what I'm concentrating my energy and research on now.

@P-N.

Thank you for your advise ans concurrence, Living here for almost 5 years, I understand you completely, the wheels will be very well greased, although I'm not sure my contacts could rival your :)

While I'm posting this on the forum, and a little off topic, do you guys ever get together for Dinner, drinks etc, on a regular basis ? If so where do you go ? and if not, I would surely like to meet some of you, can we meet sometime in the near future ?

Carlusha

  • Guest

While I'm posting this on the forum, and a little off topic, do you guys ever get together for Dinner, drinks etc, on a regular basis ? If so where do you go ? and if not, I would surely like to meet some of you, can we meet sometime in the near future ?

We're off very shortly and not due back for some months. I enjoy meeting the others socially now and again as long as it is the centre as I do not drive while here in Odessa.

When we return, I will look you up if you don't mind meeting with the oldest member of the good ship expatua. Maybe we can organise something then with the others. While we're away, should you go ahead, do enjoy yourself for those I've met are ALL very, very nice guys and all gentlemen!


Offline tjtag

  • Subscriber
  • Expat Messenger
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 0
  • -Receive: 0
  • Posts: 11
  • Gender: Male
@Carlushika,

Most certainly, look me up when you get back !!

Regards,

Offline EnglishMKyiv

  • Subscriber
  • I live here
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 37
  • -Receive: 284
  • Posts: 706
Simple question this one...

I have a multi entry business visa and need to register with OVIR by 19th February.

The owner of my appartment cannot/will not give me an official contract - so I cannot register ... how can I overcome this?

Joe



We live only to discover beauty. All else is a form of waiting.

richardm

  • Guest
The only way is that you need to find someone else who would be willing to say that you live in their apartment, but as we all know that is a tough ask as locals dont want to declare this stuff.

If you have a multi entry visa its far easier to do a border run before the date you mention, that will keep you right for another 90 days, a far easier option in my book, also gets you out of Kiev for a weekend which is always a godsend and chance to recharge the batteries.

Offline EnglishMKyiv

  • Subscriber
  • I live here
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 37
  • -Receive: 284
  • Posts: 706
Border run is not possible this time ... too busy.

I guess I will have to pay the fine next time I leave on a business trip.... as long as they let me in again next time I return.

Joe
We live only to discover beauty. All else is a form of waiting.

Offline rigi

  • Subscriber
  • Newbie
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 1
  • -Receive: 0
  • Posts: 4
Hi Everyone

got a small question does all those documents need to be legalised

We required -

In order to apply for permanent residence in Ukraine the following documents should be submitted:

    * written request (duly signed and dated) with formal declaration of intentions to apply for permanent
       residence in Ukraine (explaining reasons and indicating whether the applicant will be seeking financial
       assistance after being lawfully admitted for permanent residence);
    * completed application form in Ukrainian;
    * copy of the document confirming identity;
    * three recent passport sized photographs;
    * document confirming the place of residence;
    * information on family members, a copy of marriage certificate (if applicant is married);
    * police reply under the subject access provisions of the Data Protection Act 1998;
    * medical report certifying that applicant does not suffer from the infectious diseases, drug, toxic or
       alcohol addiction.

Offline Daniel

  • Subscriber
  • Expat VS
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 1
  • -Receive: 11
  • Posts: 51
Only your marriage certificate and the certificate on absence of previous convictions in your home country should be legalised.