Author Topic: Visa & Registration Questions - Ask Now or Forever Hold Your Peace  (Read 28941 times)

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buba

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Not very funny in fact   ::)

I dont know in which kind of businness you are or if you have any experience with this. This is the normal price for a serious commercial lawyer in Kiev.

Dont worry i m not stupid and will not pay more then market price.

buba

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Of course I m speaking about average lawyers. If you need the "best legal services" in town, i.e. Baker McKenzie...is 750+ USD per hour

Offline matlockk

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So I finally got my IM-1 visa into OVIR. Fingers crossed. The marriage stamp didn't help as you have to take your wedding certificate to OVIR and I think they would have spotted the Russianess of my better half.

buba

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any news? does this decree exist?  :-\

Offline matlockk

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So I finally got my IM-1 visa into OVIR. Fingers crossed. The marriage stamp didn't help as you have to take your wedding certificate to OVIR and I think they would have spotted the Russianess of my better half.

Picked up the documents and passport from OVIR last week. I have a card which says I have residence in Ukraine until my IM-1 expires and can come and go as I please.

buba

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good. was in boryspol they checked with calculator my days... :-\

even if i m married with ukrainian...they say nothing to do with immigration rules unless you have a permit...

Offline Vernie

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It would be a great relief to me if somehow the authorities would recognise my nearly 8 year marriage to a Ukrainian lady as going some way to excusing my long overdue visa  :-\  Are there anyway some steps I can take now to lessen the blow when it comes as I try to leave Ukraine - even never to return if that helps although I'll need to take the family with though.  Some awkward bureaucratic requirements in the beginning started the process of delaying my visa renewal indefinitely.

Offline dazure

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Speaking about lawyers. My lawyer gives me a fixed price for doing a specific job. Not an hourly rate.
That way we both know where we are. I know by comparison that his prices are reasonable.
He accounts for his time and if he is under he gives money back (yes) :).
If he is over he grits his teeth and puts it down to learning curve expenses :-\.

Offline Sweeper5150

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Please take anything on this site with a large grain of salt or you could wind up in the same situation as I am in.  My Registration expires in 4 days and I cannot get out of the country that quick so I am sure to be fined.

I have to report that in Kyiv this is not the case. :'(
I have just come from the Ministry of the interior and spoke with the woman that is in charge of all registration of foreigner in Ukraine.  She has stated that as of June the cabinet decree's were only up to the 500's 909 does not exist.  She could find nothing with this number.

I am now being forced to go out of the country and obtain a visa so I can live here with my Wife.  (a Ukrainian.)



Offline editor_moscow

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    • Shauna McLarnon Professional Profile
Hello. I have been reluctant to post before now, but you have inspired me. I am also in the process of applying for my permanent residence. We have all but one document ready and it looks like it might go ahead, but let me share my experience as to how things are proceeding (at least at the regional OVIR) regarding this application.

My husband, a Ukrainian citizen, and I have met several times now with the chief person responsible for dealing with foreigners. We have been told the same thing as Sweeper5150 relayed - that no decision has actually been taken, but that this is a draft/ proposal. As such, there is no directive to OVIR officials to speed the process up for anyone married longer than two years and with a child.

I have met one person whose application was accelerated based on the birth of a child, but he explained to me that this happened because his child was born as a citizen of Ukraine to a mother who is a citizen of Ukraine. It was during the process of registering the baby to receive her birth certificate that OVIR officials agreed to speed up his application. Of course, that was his explanation. Mind you, I have my suspicions that this all happened smoothly because his wife's family are just extremely well connected.

OK.Again about our meeting with the OVIR official. We were told that because no directive has come down the pipeline to OVIR officials in the regions, the process by which I could receive my permanent residence would still likely take one year. She did qualify, however, that if within that time period the proposed law is passed and the directive channels down to OVIR offices, then the process may be done quicker.

Disheartened, I then proceeded to learn what my options are, since I certainly need to stay in the country and cannot be subject to any 180-day rule. I asked her about that rule and she said that to date, it IS in force and IT ISN'T in force......... :)   She then proceeded to qualify that border officials have received the directive to enforce this 180-day rule, which will make it difficult for us foreigners to simply continue doing a border run, with the aim of returning to Ukraine shortly afterwards. Indeed OVIR officials are aware of this legislation but they, themselves, have not received the directive to enforce it or to change their Standard Operating Procedures with respect to processing foreigners in any way. Sooooo... she explained to me that I could feasibly remain in the country by:
1) staying here for my full visa-free 90 days;
2) register my presence with their OVIR office when I hand in my application for permanent residence (which should be shortly and certainly within the allowable 90 days);
3) extend my stay in Ukraine by six months (based on my registration at my husband's address). Unlike receiving a visitor visa, in order for a Ukrainian citizen to register a prolongation of your visit to Ukraine, they must be a home owner and not simply a renter. I guess that would be the landlord for some people, or just a good friend;
4) a few days before this six month term comes to its end, apply for another extension to your visit. The maximum allowable extension is six months, though it is at their discretion whether they allow you three or six, depending on your stated reason for wanting to extend your stay. "To spend time with family" and "I'm engaged to be married to a Ukrainian" always work and so does "I'm waiting for my permanent residence application to be processed", if these situations apply to you.

By then, the permanent resident application should have been processed. My philosophy is that I better be safe than sorry, so as soon as I visit Kiev again, I'm hauling hubby, our passports and our wedding certificate into the ZAGs office where we got married and getting the stamp from them that says I have the right to stick around (and thus, won't risk overstaying my visit) in any case.  Then I'll show the stamp to the local OVIR officials and see how they react to it.
 
I'll keep you all posted as to how things develop.

Cheers, Shauna

ecocks

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Go Shauna, Go Shauna, Go Shauna!

Heyyyyyyy-OH!

Heyyyyyyy-OH!

LOL!

Ed

Offline Sweeper5150

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Shauna,

Thank you. Let me add that I have the marriage stamp in my passport.  It does me no good, until I actually have the "BlueCard" which I can't apply for until September 1st I must have a visa.  They have just given me 2 weeks to go and get one.  I am going to ask for an addtional 2 weeks on Wednesday as my wallet was stolen on the 14th.  I am waiting for my new cards so I can book flights and hotels whereever I wind up going.

rjm

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Yes I was in Ovir 10 days ago and was lucky enough to have been given an appointment with the top guy in OVIR on T Shevchenko, he was clueless about the new regulations on 90 day rule and registration after 3 months rule and wasnt even aware that fines were being handed out for people who hadnt registered, this proves the whole situation is in complete disarray.

Much has been written on this topic and as you rightly so most of it is not correct, the truth is that there is still no definite rule, new laws have been introduced but are not being enforced regarding the 90 day rule, I know of someone whos friend hopped out of Ukraine into Poland last Friday and came back next day to start another 90 days.

The only thing that does appear to be enforced is the fine at Boryspol if you have not registered at OVIR in 3 months, so I advise everyone to make sure that they do this. (although I know that for many its impossible to get an address to use)

My advice to everyone here who has a visa is to make sure they are registered (even if they have to pay the 340gr fine at OVIR that I had to) then get the visa extended the week before it expires in tbe way that Shauna describes, this is a better option in my view than having to leave the country for a border run which might be refused re entry or an expensive trip for another visa to Warsaw or Krakow.



 
Please take anything on this site with a large grain of salt or you could wind up in the same situation as I am in.  My Registration expires in 4 days and I cannot get out of the country that quick so I am sure to be fined.

I have to report that in Kyiv this is not the case. :'(
I have just come from the Ministry of the interior and spoke with the woman that is in charge of all registration of foreigner in Ukraine.  She has stated that as of June the cabinet decree's were only up to the 500's 909 does not exist.  She could find nothing with this number.

I am now being forced to go out of the country and obtain a visa so I can live here with my Wife.  (a Ukrainian.)




Offline AlexMc

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Can anyone recommend a reliable law office or agency that can assist in obtaining a permanent residency status in Ukraine?  I understand that it is possible to obtain a permanent residency status in Ukraine when you are married to a Ukrainian for longer than 2 years and you do not need to bother about work permit or entry visas with such a status at all.    Many thanks in advance for any useful information. 

Kind regards,

Alex
alexmccall@yahoo.co.uk

Offline AlexMc

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Can anyone recommend a reliable law office or agency that can assist in obtaining a permanent residency status in Ukraine?  I understand that it is possible to obtain a permanent residency status in Ukraine when you are married to a Ukrainian for longer than 2 years and you do not need to bother about work permit or entry visas with such a status at all.    Many thanks in advance for any useful information. 

Kind regards,

Alex
alexmccall@yahoo.co.uk



Thanks for the recommendations to all those who droped e-mails to my mailbox.   Jonathan Burns of Carlton Legal (carltoninfo@ukr.net) proved the most helpful in respect of the immigration law in Ukraine and specifically about obtaining permenent residency status in Ukraine.  I would recommend Jonathan for this type of work for anyone.