Author Topic: Homesteading in Ukraine  (Read 11749 times)

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Tnic

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Re: Homesteading in Ukraine
« Reply #15 on: 06:17 11-May-2012 »
Well, I do not know much about homesteading - but good luck with it!  :)
In principle I'm against chopping fruit-trees, but when you chop the apples, use it for firewood, the scent is adorable!

Or better yet, save the apple wood for your smokehouse.  You'll love what it does for food.

Thanks for starting this thread!  I'll be following your progress closely, since we'll be on the hunt next Spring for our plot of land.

Offline kyivkpic

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Re: Homesteading in Ukraine
« Reply #16 on: 09:28 11-May-2012 »
Well, I do not know much about homesteading - but good luck with it!  :)
In principle I'm against chopping fruit-trees, but when you chop the apples, use it for firewood, the scent is adorable!

Or better yet, save the apple wood for your smokehouse.  You'll love what it does for food.

Thanks for starting this thread!  I'll be following your progress closely, since we'll be on the hunt next Spring for our plot of land.

Thanks, Tnic  ;D I hadn't thought of a smoke house. After I split the logs I'll stack it in the barn to dry. How long does it need to season for smoking meat?

Good luck with your search, Tnic. We had to look at alot of plots to find the one we wanted. We're about 35km southwest of Kyiv. The area is nice and there are available plots. It takes patience to find the right one. I suggest you look in winter. The prices seem to be lower then.
Твоя голова всегда в ответе за то, куда сядет твой зад.

Tnic

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Re: Homesteading in Ukraine
« Reply #17 on: 12:44 11-May-2012 »
Any time my friend.  I'd let the wood cure over the winter.  The excess moisture will have evaporated and you won't have to worry about creosote then.

I've already decided that the smoke house will likely be the first structure to go up on our plot.  It can serve as secure storage while we build then get used for the good stuff later.

Our timing to begun the search will depend on how much $$ we blow on our Maine vacation in July/Aug.  I'd like to have 5-7K USD in the bank for that venture to go along with LOML's credit.  I hope to find 10-15 sotka as we plan to build a second attached home for dochka when we get settled a bit.  That way there will still be plenty of space for the grandboy's play area and a bit of a garden.


Carlusha

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Re: Homesteading in Ukraine
« Reply #18 on: 14:46 11-May-2012 »
Lads, I am sure we will all be keeping up with your latest efforts and therefore your topic has been made "Sticky" (липкий)

Good luck to you both and your families.

Offline kyivkpic

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Re: Homesteading in Ukraine
« Reply #19 on: 22:14 11-May-2012 »
Thanks, Carl ;)

My wife has found an architect with some designs we like. Some of her work is too kitschy for me but I like the rustic style and the energy efficiency.

http://www.ernst.kiev.ua/Pleseckoe_ru.html

Quote
We provide the full range of architectural services for energy-efficient private and public buildings and buildings that conform to the Passive House standard. We also specialise in the architectural design of schools and child care facilities in line with the special psychosomatic requirements of younger children.

The practice is headed by Ukrainian architect Tetiana Ernst, who graduated from the State Academy of Fine Arts (Stuttgart, Germany) in 2003 and received her PhD from the National Academy of Fine Arts and Architecture (Kyiv, Ukraine) in 2007. Mrs. Ernst has over six years of hands-on experience in the design and building of energy-efficient buildings and ?passive? homes.

Твоя голова всегда в ответе за то, куда сядет твой зад.

Offline clanholmes

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Re: Homesteading in Ukraine
« Reply #20 on: 01:46 12-May-2012 »
Thanks, Carl ;)

My wife has found an architect with some designs we like. Some of her work is too kitschy for me but I like the rustic style and the energy efficiency.

http://www.ernst.kiev.ua/Pleseckoe_ru.html

Quote
We provide the full range of architectural services for energy-efficient private and public buildings and buildings that conform to the Passive House standard. We also specialise in the architectural design of schools and child care facilities in line with the special psychosomatic requirements of younger children.

The practice is headed by Ukrainian architect Tetiana Ernst, who graduated from the State Academy of Fine Arts (Stuttgart, Germany) in 2003 and received her PhD from the National Academy of Fine Arts and Architecture (Kyiv, Ukraine) in 2007. Mrs. Ernst has over six years of hands-on experience in the design and building of energy-efficient buildings and ?passive? homes.

I would save some choice logs for a sauna.
I know nothing except the fact of my ignorance.
Socrates

Read, but not write

Offline kyivkpic

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Re: Homesteading in Ukraine
« Reply #21 on: 20:36 17-May-2012 »
Thanks, Carl ;)

My wife has found an architect with some designs we like. Some of her work is too kitschy for me but I like the rustic style and the energy efficiency.

http://www.ernst.kiev.ua/Pleseckoe_ru.html

Quote
We provide the full range of architectural services for energy-efficient private and public buildings and buildings that conform to the Passive House standard. We also specialise in the architectural design of schools and child care facilities in line with the special psychosomatic requirements of younger children.

The practice is headed by Ukrainian architect Tetiana Ernst, who graduated from the State Academy of Fine Arts (Stuttgart, Germany) in 2003 and received her PhD from the National Academy of Fine Arts and Architecture (Kyiv, Ukraine) in 2007. Mrs. Ernst has over six years of hands-on experience in the design and building of energy-efficient buildings and ?passive? homes.

I would save some choice logs for a sauna.

That is already planned.

@Claus. We planted two chervonets apple saplings, . They should start producing within a couple of years. Also planted some kishmish grapes vines and petunias and irises.
Твоя голова всегда в ответе за то, куда сядет твой зад.

Offline kyivkpic

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Re: Homesteading in Ukraine
« Reply #22 on: 12:25 19-May-2012 »
So we've met our first dilemma. 

The lot to the west is wooded but to our east is the local charity case. Their property is in shambles with garbage everywhere and it appears they had a fire sometime in the recent past which didn't help. The mother doesn't seem to do much but smoke and yell at the four children. They are all under the age of 12 at the most. They look healthy and clean but are shy like rural children are. They just stare at us. My wife has tried to speak with but only briefly. I would like the 12 year old to do a few chores for us and we could help them with some cash, at the least so the kids can enjoy a few luxuries. I started to doing the same at about the same age (mowing grass, trimming bushes, etc.). It seems to be politically incorrect these days, however.

The problem is the father. He's a real piece of work. A couple of weeks ago I took my girls to lake in the afternoon. Babushka stayed at the house to work on some of her projects. We had eaten lunch and packed up most of our things because we we're going to head back to Kyiv after relaxing at the lake. We had left the stroller, though, and the guy next door thought we had left it and didn't know that Babushka was still there. Babushka reported that she heard him clearly yelling to the kids in the back of their yard to go and take our stroller. He was up near their house. One of the girls, about 10 y.o, came into our yard toward the stroller and Babushka came out from around the house and the girl ran off yelling that we were still there.

I wasn't told about until we got home. Last week when we went to the homestead I planned a sting but it didn't turn out. I did have the pleasure of seeing the neighbor come out in the cold and rain in his speedo, piss drunk, and yell at the kids.

I'm hoping that since the douchebag was caught in the act that he knows that we will know it is him if any of our stuff comes up missing. I talked to our other decent neighbors and they all said he is trouble. I saw him jump over the neighbors fence across the road. He was hollering to them and they were just ignoring him but I guess he needed to see them.

We're putting up a fence soon.

So the question is, what approach would be best towards the children? If their father does steal from my family I can have him dealt with, and harshly, but I'd rather not. I would like for us to be able to foster a relationship with the children and help them and not alienate them or their parents. I'm weary of giving gifts, other than food, because it won't teach them anything. My wife hasn't told me it is taboo to have children do chores for pocket money and I think this the best option. She also tells me that she doesn't think they will understand. Earning something through work doesn't seem to be a value in their family, nor cleaning up one's own home, etc.

Like I said, they are shy.  They've started to respond to "hello" and my wife has has had a few words with them. I suppose that is about all we can do, yeah? I'm not naive enough to imagine any organizations would be able to help them and they do look clean and healthy and aren't in any immediate danger so... we'll just do what we can but any other insights would be appreciated.
« Last Edit: 15:24 19-May-2012 by kyivkpic »
Твоя голова всегда в ответе за то, куда сядет твой зад.

Carlusha

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Re: Homesteading in Ukraine
« Reply #23 on: 14:13 19-May-2012 »
I can only suggest if you do succeed in actually getting the children to do the odd job, always be aware of how little the Ukrainian minimum wage is. I say this because it is so easy to exceed that even though you do not feel particularly generous.

Word will get around and you may attract attention if you are overly generous.




Offline kyivkpic

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Re: Homesteading in Ukraine
« Reply #24 on: 15:40 19-May-2012 »
I can only suggest if you do succeed in actually getting the children to do the odd job, always be aware of how little the Ukrainian minimum wage is. I say this because it is so easy to exceed that even though you do not feel particularly generous.

Word will get around and you may attract attention if you are overly generous.

Thank, Carl. It's a good point. I'll keep it mind.
Твоя голова всегда в ответе за то, куда сядет твой зад.

Tnic

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Re: Homesteading in Ukraine
« Reply #25 on: 06:30 20-May-2012 »
Sounds like Papa is a prime candidate for a "blanket party" if you and the other neighbors could set one up.  The US Marines call it a code red. 

A blanket over the head and a bar of soap in a sock does wonders for one's uncivil attitude.  He won't likely consider the PCness of it all.

A high wall works too, but its more work and less entertaining.   :D

Offline Ted

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Re: Homesteading in Ukraine
« Reply #26 on: 06:43 20-May-2012 »
BYOS   (Bring Your Own Soap)  is what we used to say in the Army.

Offline kyivkpic

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Re: Homesteading in Ukraine
« Reply #27 on: 16:01 21-May-2012 »
Sounds like Papa is a prime candidate for a "blanket party" if you and the other neighbors could set one up.  The US Marines call it a code red. 

A blanket over the head and a bar of soap in a sock does wonders for one's uncivil attitude.  He won't likely consider the PCness of it all.

A high wall works too, but its more work and less entertaining.   :D

Well, the fence is going up as soon as possible.

A "blanket party" would be entertaining. I remember "code red" from Full Metal Jacket and Private Pyle.  ;D

The problem is that he is an alcoholic, apparently, and due to the brain damage they often can't learn. After Babushka told me what  happened I quickly considered having him dealt with by the same gentlemen that dealt with the idiot who broke into my car a few months ago and had the audacity to try to sell my stolen property back to me. A report from Babushka is not enough evidence, however, and I quickly realized that it wouldn't be productive and it might result in blowback.

Yesterday, my wife talked with the kids some and learned their names. I had Babushka ask the oldest to clean up some of their garbage which has made its way into our yard. I offered 10 UAH and he said "ne nada"

So I raked it up and deposited it back on their property.
Твоя голова всегда в ответе за то, куда сядет твой зад.

Tnic

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Re: Homesteading in Ukraine
« Reply #28 on: 16:07 21-May-2012 »
I forget the movie now, but I was thinking of the one with Cruise and Nickolson.  "You can't HANDLE the truth!!"   :D  Jack was a CO at Gitmo in that one and Tom was a JAG officer.

The kids "ne nada" money or work?  This could be interesting to say the least.


Offline kyivkpic

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Re: Homesteading in Ukraine
« Reply #29 on: 16:19 21-May-2012 »
A Few Good Men.  Great movie, and Demi Moore too.

I don't know about the "ne nada." I think it meant there was no need to clean up the garbage.
Твоя голова всегда в ответе за то, куда сядет твой зад.