Author Topic: Advice on putting English-speaking child into Russian preschool?  (Read 3169 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Hollie

  • Subscriber
  • Newbie
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 0
  • -Receive: 0
  • Posts: 1
Hello -
I'd love to hear some opinions on putting a 4-year-old who does not (yet) speak more than a few words of Russian into a Russian preschool/nursery school. We have looked at several of the international schools, and really like KIS in particular, but wondering if it's a good use of money for a 4-year-old, and it is quite far from where we live. Also really want her to learn Russian.
If anyone out there has had experience in this, was it too difficult on the child? Or is it just hard the first couple of months? And what about any very good Russian pre-kindergartens or nursery schools near Kreschatyk, Maidan Nezalezhnosti, or Zoloti Verota area?
Thanks!


Offline KPIC

  • Subscriber
  • Expat VSOP
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 166
  • -Receive: 112
  • Posts: 423
  • I'm in Ukraine!!

If you help the child accelerate their learning of Russian it would be most likely a great experience for your child . Learning more than 1 language during early development makes the child's brain more sophisticated and makes it much easier to learn other languages and to communicate in general.

just my opinion. My wife Viktoriya and I are looking forward to teaching our children two speak English and Russian/Ukrainian. My wife has a diploma in English and German, and also studied Italian and french and will probably introduce them as well. We think the more the children can master language the easier it will be to master their life.
It's a strange world of language in which skating on thin ice can get you into hot water.  ~Franklin P. Jones

Offline Claus

  • Subscriber
  • I live here
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 2616
  • -Receive: 801
  • Posts: 2069
The more languages a person masters, the richer her/his life! Absolutely.
However - we're talking about a four year old kid here. Two languages at one time should do, or confusion.
Know no kindergardens etc here, my grandchildren live elsewhere - but I do know that a kid of four does not have language inhibitions and will be able to communicate very soon/fast without studying at all.
So - go look at the place; if it's clean, orderly etc, go right ahead - it's good for the kid!
j'y suis, j'y reste!

Offline mscmkr

  • Subscriber
  • I live here
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 204
  • -Receive: 106
  • Posts: 552
Will the child continue school here?
What are your thoughts on elementary school?
Russian schools are not easy to find away from former USSR countries.
For a nation to try to tax itself into prosperity is like a man standing in a bucket trying to lift himself up by the handle - W. Churchill

Carlusha

  • Guest

Offline kristik

  • Subscriber
  • Expat Messenger
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 1
  • -Receive: 5
  • Posts: 12
  • Gender: Female
If you do decide on the Ukrainian-language facility, try the Kindergarten #54 on Sofiyevskaya 23, phone number is 044 278-0832. My kids went to their "Leleka" group - it's a fee-based class within a state facility. In our group we had kids whose native languages were English, Polish, Swedish, and they did great. Just make sure it's the group "Leleka" on the second floor (for kids 5 to 7 y.o.) - the one for kids 2 to 4 seems not as exciting in terms of teachers, although that might have changed. Good luck!

Offline Travel Writer

  • Subscriber
  • Expat VSOP
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 178
  • -Receive: 94
  • Posts: 225
    • STORIES, ARTICLES AND PHOTOGRAPHS FROM UKRAINE
Hi Hollie,

I worked for a couple of weeks as a supply teacher at KIS, invited by a friend of mine who works in their admin department. I was very impressed by how friendly and clean the school was, how well the children were looked after (good textbooks, cafeteria, sports hall, excursions...) and how well children from many countries got on. I think it would be a great environment for your daughter to learn Russian in; because most of the children speak English but almost all speak Russian, it would be easier for her to acclimatise than if you were to put her somewhere where no-one speaks English.

If you like, I can put you in touch with my friend there?

Jon

Carlusha

  • Guest
Nice one, Jon!

Offline mscmkr

  • Subscriber
  • I live here
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 204
  • -Receive: 106
  • Posts: 552
+1 for KIS. The school's nice. Expensive (cheaper than other english-speaking schools though) but nice.
But I wouldn't vote it as number one spot for getting in touch with Russian.

(But I think we are talking to ourselves. OP hasn't shown up around here since she made that question...)
« Last Edit: 19:16 14-Apr-2011 by mscmkr »
For a nation to try to tax itself into prosperity is like a man standing in a bucket trying to lift himself up by the handle - W. Churchill